More About Nicky And Stavros’ “VIP” Visit

    It doesn’t matter where they go, Hiltons don’t wait in line.

    With just about every single media outlet on the planet trying to shove a mic in their faces, Paris’ sister Nicky and on-again off-again-who-knows-what Stavros Niarchos rolled down to Twin Towers Correctional Facility in Los Angeles yesterday to visit Paris — waltzing right into the building without having to wait in the ridiculously long visitors line. Family members and friends of other inmates complained that they had to wait for more than three hours. But TMZ has learned that the two were ushered in during a break in the normal visitor schedule, due to Paris’ “special needs” situation.

    While she didn’t say a word about the situation on her way into the jail, Nicky opened up on the way out of the 30-minute visit, telling reporters that Paris is, “being strong” during her second stint behind bars. As usual, Stavros didn’t say a word.

    Nicky’s boyfriend, David Katzenberg, drove the pair down to the jail, but Paris was only allowed two visitors. He waited in the car.

    TMZ

    Posted: June 11th, 2007
    Comments: none

    Download The Third Episode Of Simple Life 5

    Pageant Girls Just Want to Have Fun

    Paris and Nicole become camp counselors to a group of young women and their moms as they learn what it takes to become pageant winners.

    The Simple Life 5 – Episode 2 XviD.avi

    Posted: June 10th, 2007
    Comments: 6

    Barbara Walters Talked To Paris Hilton On Sunday

    Barbara Walters “had an exclusive conversation via telephone with Paris Hilton on Sunday afternoon,” according to an internal ABC memo circulated Sunday.

    The conversation wasn’t recorded. But the highlights, as recalled by Walters, will be teased on Good Morning America Monday morning, along with an ABCNews.com story.

    But Walters is holding some details for later in the day. At 11am, “Walters will give a full debrief of her conversation on The View,” the memo says…

    mediabistro.com

    Posted: June 10th, 2007
    Comments: 3

    Paris Hilton’s Behavior In The Courtroom

    I’m not sure if you noticed, but the media has been joking and laughing at Paris Hilton’s behavior in the courtroom.

    One thing we know is that she was crying all the time and shaking uncontrollably as she watched injustice unfolding before her, after the monster and the evil media humiliated her by forcing her to come to court and be nothing more than a spectator.

    There are very important behavior traits that need to be addressed lest there be misunderstandings. Paris was seen several times turning to her mom and saying “I love you.” At the end, after the obvious verdict was revealed to her, she screamed and said “Mom, Mom, Mom” and “It’s not right.”

    The media, of course, has subverted the meaning of this behavior and suggested that her behavior proves that she is spoiled and doesn’t want to face her consequences. Now that’s quite easy to say, isn’t it?

    Actually, what Paris’ behavior shows is something that many Americans are missing these days. It’s what the Hilton family is all about. It’s about family.

    Paris acted that way because she saw no hope. She saw that she didn’t have the right to be treated fairly, and so she turned to the closest person she knew. Many people don’t know this, but Paris and her mother are very close with each other. She calls her 10 times a day, apparently.

    It’s hard to explain this emotional behavior because I’m not a mother, but I know that many moms out there and those who email me understand it perfectly well. Kathy, as a mother, also cried because she knew she couldn’t do anything for her daughter.

    It’s something that some people don’t have these days, especially adults and the media making a mockery out of it made me sick. Well, maybe they misunderstood it.

    So Paris was left all alone. A philosopher called Heraclitus once said that one can find strength through despair. You might learn about this in college.

    That’s why I believe that Paris will come back with full force after she finishes serving her jail term, knowing full well that her harsh punishment will serve as a good example for others.

    This is just my personal opinion, BTW.

    Posted: June 10th, 2007
    Comments: 7

    Paris Hilton’s Case Shows A Big Flaw In The Judicial System

    Written before Paris dropped her appeal

    As Paris burns back in county jail, the debate over her short-lived release rages on, with law experts dissecting the thorny legal issues raised by the Simple Life star’s sentence.

    The main issue? Whether Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Michael T. Sauer was correct in overruling Sheriff Lee Baca’s decision to transfer Hilton to house arrest after just three full days in jail for what was originally a 45-day sentence.

    “It’s really bizarre that the most frivolous person in the western world in the most frivolous case in which she didn’t know she has a license to drive might end up creating precedent that could affect thousands of prisoners and where they’re housed and how they’re housed for years to come,” said Stan Goldman, professor of criminal law at Loyola University Law School.

    Goldman and others agree the showdown creates a legal quandary—i.e., whether the elected sheriff is truly independent of the judiciary and whether Judge Sauer overstepped his bounds.

    “The judge attempted to impose control over the sentence,” said Jody Armour, professor of law at the University of Southern California. “The sheriff doesn’t have discretion to do anything willy-nilly, but once the custody of an inmate has been given over to his department, the sheriff is given a lot of latitude. But with one huge exception.”

    Armour said that Sauer’s sentencing order explicitly forbade Baca from putting her in home confinement. “The judge was trying to limit the discretion of the sheriff, and the sheriff was saying this is our domain,” Armour said.

    “The Sheriff’s Department didn’t know that their discretionary decision would be overridden by the judge. But apparently so far they’re mistaken, and now, unfortunately, Paris is paying the price of that confusion and that misunderstanding.”

    The point was seconded by one of Armour’s colleagues at USC. “Usually the court is very loath to intervene with how the sheriff runs his jail facilities. He may have reason to move people around because of overcrowding or an emergency arises,” observed law professor Jean Rosenbluth. “But I think because the judge said from the very start no home confinement and 23 days, and the sheriff didn’t get his permission…the judge was quick to assert his control.”

    Sauer hauled Hilton back into court early Friday after learning that Baca had authorized Hilton’s so-called reassignment. The sheriff’s move sparked a monster PR nightmare, with accusations of his department giving special treatment to the hotel heiress.

    At a Friday press conference, Baca attempted to deflect criticism by first asserting that Hilton was a “low-level offender” and he was under a federal mandate to reduce inmate overcrowding. He then switched tacks and said she had “severe medical problems” and her condition was “rapidly deteriorating” without proper medication. After consulting with two psychologists, he made his decision.

    Goldman said the 23 days Hilton is expected to serve of her sentence (once she’s credited for time served and good behavior) is typical for such offenders, and normally she might get released after two weeks. But Goldman thinks that the hoopla over Hilton’s early release could work against her.

    “Is the sheriff going to be so gun-shy that he’s not going to release her in 15 or 16 days but they’re going make her do the 23?” Goldman wondered. “The question is, Can a judge in L.A. override that? Up until now, my answer would have been no. I have no doubt [Hilton’s lawyer] is going to appeal this to a higher court and decide whether [the sheriff] is independently functioning from the judge.”

    Which is what Hilton’s camp said they planned to do. Goldman thinks the appeal has a shot at success.

    “I’ve never seen someone pulled out of house arrest because the judge didn’t like it, as opposed to the judge saying that they violated the rules of house of arrest. It may be that the court of appeals may completely agree with the judge,” he said.

    Sauer has hardly been sympathetic to Hilton. During his original sentencing, he chided her for failing to take responsibility for her errors after prosecutors showed she was twice caught driving with a suspended license within weeks after pleading no contest to alcohol-related reckless driving in January.

    Baca said Hilton was being tossed around like a “football” by the criminal justice system. According to the legal experts, she will likely suffer much more than had she never got out of solitary confinement in the first place.

    “The sense of deprivation being so close to a release and you have expectations and then to have those firm expectations dashed with such a stark reversal of fortune must be really psychologically traumatic,” said Armour. “This has to heap on even more psychological trauma on her.”

    Added Goldman: “I’ve never had one defendant say to me that he was glad to be out. They all said [they were] sorry they didn’t go straight through because it was just too much for them to come out and have to go back in.”

    Eonline

    Posted: June 10th, 2007
    Comments: 1

    Nicky And Stavros Visit Paris Hilton In Jail

    Paris Hilton’s sister Nicky and ex-boyfriend Stavros Niarchos bypassed a line of visitors Sunday and were ushered through security to see the jailed heiress singer.

    Nicky’s boyfriend David Katzenberg drove the pair to the Twin Towers Correctional Facility’s medical ward. They entered through a crush of photographers, filled out visitation forms, and spent a half-hour upstairs before leaving without talking to reporters.

    Other visitors grumbled that they jumped the line.

    “We don’t care about no Paris Hilton,” said one upset mother. “We’re here for our families.”

    Said another relative, “Why did they get to go up first, that’s what I want to know?”

    Sheriff’s spokesman Steve Whitmore denied the pair got special treatment.

    Nicky Hilton and Niarchos were the first family or friends admitted as visitors since Hilton was sent to the locked-down ward Friday after a brief reassignment to home confinement because of unidentified medical condition. Hilton was visited Saturday by her psychiatrist.

    Hilton, 26, originally surrendered June 3 to a women’s jail in Lynwood, Calif. She says she will not fight her sentence and serve out the remainder of her minimum 23-day term for violating probation in alcohol-related driving case for driving with a suspended license. With time off for good behavior, she could leave in just over two weeks.






    People

    Posted: June 10th, 2007
    Comments: 2

    Paris Hilton On The Brink Of Becoming A Hollywood Star?

    One day Paris Hilton is screaming for her mommy as she is cuffed and taken to the pokey in a reckless driving case. The next, she‘s the model of magnanimity, saying she wouldn‘t appeal her 45-day sentence and that she is “learning and growing” from her time behind bars.”Based on the way the story has been playing out, this is a good move for her,” said Michael Levine, who has served as publicist for dozens of celebrities, including Michael Jackson , Barbara Streisand and Bill O‘Reilly. “Experience has taught me that celebrities respect wisdom but obey pain. What I mean by that is that when they feel the heat they see the light.”

    If Levine were working with the celebutante, he would recommend she show she has learned from the experience by fading from the party scene for awhile and getting behind sympathetic causes like Angelina Jolie , who traded her bad girl credentials to become a mother and a goodwill ambassador for the United Nations .

    Hilton‘s publicist, Elliott Mintz, did not immediately return e-mail or phone messages.

    She has been at the downtown facility since Friday, when Superior Court Judge Michael T. Sauer ordered her back to jail. Sheriff Lee Baca had released her to house arrest the day before for undisclosed health reasons. Hilton was taken from Sauer‘s courtroom in tears and calling for her mother.

    Hilton was expected to serve only 23 days because of a state law that requires shorter sentences for good behavior.

    She also said she was “shocked” by the attention her case has received and suggested the public and media focus on “more important things like the men and women serving our country in Iraq .”

    “Showing is doing,” he said. “If Paris is really concerned about the media paying attention to the men and women in Iraq and Afghanistan , then why didn‘t she sign autographs at military bases and hospitals?”

    “I think that the public this time is disgusted with her and probably asking themselves why they even bother,” he said. “So she‘s on the brink of becoming a caricature or a person. And I think she does have that choice. The next step is hopefully to reveal by her words and actions that she has taken responsibility for being an adult.”

    In the months that followed, she was stopped twice by officers who discovered her driving on a suspended license. The second stop landed her in Sauer‘s courtroom, where he sentenced her to jail.

    Sands describes Hilton‘s change of heart as “media ploy.” But unlike actor/director Mel Gibson — who remains on the fringes after he launched an anti-Semitic tirade at the police officer who arrested him for drunken driving last summer — Hilton will emerge smelling as sweet as her namesake perfume, he said.

    “She will become a real Hollywood star from this experience,” he said. “If she handles it like a famous person and goes to a military base, visits Walter Reed, then Hollywood will embrace her. It‘s very forgiving. It‘s not like she insulted the Jews.”

    AP

    Posted: June 10th, 2007
    Comments: 4

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